procession

procession
procession, parade, cortege, cavalcade, motorcade mean a body (as of persons and vehicles) moving along in order.
Procession stresses the orderly arrangement and smooth procedure; often it suggests formality, solemnity, and pomp
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a funeral procession

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and all the priests and friars in my realm shall in procession sing her endless praise— Shak.

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and delegate Dead from each past age and race, viewless to man, in large procession pace— Lanier

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Parade is used of a usually large and formal procession. The term also implies marching in a more or less military fashion to the accompaniment of a band and often suggests other evidences of pomp and display (see also DISPLAY)
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the Fourth of July program includes a parade and fireworks

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the annual parades of both organizations . . . open-air festivals, with colorful banners, drum and fife bands— Mogey

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there was a parade in honor of the successful candidate for governor

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Cortege, sometimes used in the meaning of a retinue or train, usually means a procession of mourners at a funeral; it can refer either to those who follow the casket on foot or to those who follow in vehicles
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declared that the cortege of the dead emperor must set forth on the journey homeward— Buck

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Cavalcade throws the emphasis upon the moving of men on horseback or in vehicles; often it applies specifically to a dignitary and his retinue
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the king's cavalcade through the gates of the city the day before his coronation— Walpole

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and only indirectly does it suggest the appeal of a spectacle or spectacular procession.
Motorcade may replace cavalcade when the intent is to stress mechanized as distinguished from equine power; otherwise the two terms are similar in values
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with a motorcade of more than 2,000 vehicles, New York yesterday celebrated its traffic safety record for the first quarter— N. Y. American

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more than 300 floats will form a brilliant motorcade to the fairgrounds— Brooklyn Daily Eagle

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the three heads of state motored to Arlington Cemetery. It was raw and windy as the motorcade entered the cemetery— Time

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Analogous words: *succession, sequence, train: pomp, array (see DISPLAY)

New Dictionary of Synonyms. 2014.

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  • procession — [ prɔsesjɔ̃ ] n. f. • 1150; lat. processio « action de s avancer », de procedere « s avancer » I ♦ 1 ♦ Cortège, défilé religieux plus ou moins solennel qui s effectue en chantant et en priant. Procession des Rameaux, de la Fête Dieu. Suivre une… …   Encyclopédie Universelle

  • procession — Procession. s. f. Troupe d Ecclesiastiques, de Religieux, &c. qui marchent en ordre, recitant des Prieres, & chantant les loüanges de Dieu. Grande, belle procession. la procession ordinaire, aller en procession, à la procession. suivre la… …   Dictionnaire de l'Académie française

  • Procession — Pro*ces sion, n. [F., fr. L. processio. See {Proceed}.] [1913 Webster] 1. The act of proceeding, moving on, advancing, or issuing; regular, orderly, or ceremonious progress; continuous course. Bp. Pearson. [1913 Webster] That the procession of… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Procession — Saltar a navegación, búsqueda «Procession» Canción de Queen Álbum Queen II Publicación 1974 …   Wikipedia Español

  • procession — (n.) c.1100, from O.Fr. procession (11c.), from L.L. processionem (nom. processio) religious procession, in classical Latin a marching onward, noun of action from pp. stem of procedere (see PROCEED (Cf. proceed)). Verb process (accent on second… …   Etymology dictionary

  • Procession — Pro*ces sion, v. t. (Law) To ascertain, mark, and establish the boundary lines of, as lands. [Local, U. S. (North Carolina and Tennessee).] To procession the lands of such persons as desire it. Burrill. [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Procession — Pro*ces sion, v. i. To march in procession. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • Procession — Pro*ces sion, v. i. To honor with a procession. [R.] [1913 Webster] …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • procession — [prō sesh′ən, prəsesh′ən] n. [OFr < L processio < procedere: see PROCEED] 1. the act of proceeding, esp. in an orderly manner 2. a number of persons or things moving forward, as in a parade, in an orderly, formal way vi. Rare to go in a… …   English World dictionary

  • Procession — (v. lat.), 1) Prunkzug, Aufzug; 2) feierlicher Aufzug, bes. religiöser Art, um der Gottheit od. einem Heiligen seine Anbetung od. Verehrung zu erkennen zu geben, u. um sich der Huld u. Gnadenerweisungen derselben zu versichern. Schon bei den… …   Pierer's Universal-Lexikon

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